Illustration

Quirky Illustrations by Virginia Mori Blend Melancholy and Surreal Humor

February 23, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Using simple line drawings and pared down images, Virginia Mori captures complex human emotions. Though many of Mori’s illustrations lean toward the melancholy with themes of isolation and anxiety, moments of levity and escapism can be found, especially in her works that feature books. Mori’s artworks tend to feature just one person, often a young female protagonist, or a few people who aren’t quite interacting.

The artist lives and works in Italy, and in addition to her pencil and pen drawings, she also is an animator. Recently, Mori’s illustrations were the inspiration for a photo series with the fashion brand Gucci. You can see more of her work on her website, as well as Instagram and Facebook. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Design

A National Park-Inspired Chapel Composed of Branching Fractals by Yu Momeoda

February 23, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Agri Chapel is located within a national park on the northwest coast of Japan’s island of Kyushu. The chapel was constructed by Japanese architect Yu Momoeda, who wanted to reflect the surrounding forest by bringing tree-like forms into the building.

To create the structure’s central dome, Momoeda stacked wooden pillars in the shape of simplistic tree branches. This nature-based support system imitates the branching fractals found in trees, with ascending symmetrical patterns spread throughout the light-filled space. (via Jeroen Apers)

 

 



Art Photography

An Experimental Short Film Captures the Dramatic Dance of the Seasons

February 22, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

French film director Thomas Blanchard (previously) is known for his video work with oils and inks. In his most recent video, DANCE DANCE, Blanchard uses flowers as the contextual framework for his signature coils and swirls of color. Flowers have long been used as symbols of vitality and mortality, and the fire and ice these blooms are subjected to suggests a literal interpretation of those concepts. In the dramatically scored video, flowers and foliage light on fire, freeze and melt in icy pools, and are consumed by billowing clouds of colorful smoke. You can see more of Blanchard’s work on Vimeo, Behance, and Facebook. (via We and the Color)

 

 



Art

Complex Moiré Patterns Created by Mechanical Drawings Machines by James Nolan Gandy

February 22, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Artist and metalworker James Nolan Gandy creates elaborate drawing machines that easily put your childhood spirograph to shame. The machines are engineered from relatively simple mechanisms that when combined, produce mind-boggling shapes and interconnected moiré patterns.

Although the gears and pulleys are crafted in a way to make some of the work on their own, Gandy has not yet manufactured a system to lift the pen at specific intervals. Therefore many of his works are collaborative studies, equally created from the talents of man and machine. Some of my favorites are those created with a high contrast between paper and ink, such as the brilliant blue form seen in his drawing below.

You can view more of Gandy’s drawing machines in action on his Instagram. (via The Awesomer)

A post shared by James Nolan Gandy (@gandyworks) on

A post shared by James Nolan Gandy (@gandyworks) on

 

 



Craft

Elaborate Paper Origami Tessellations and Kusudamas by Ekaterina Lukasheva

February 21, 2018

Christopher Jobson

Moscow-based paper artist Ekaterina Lukasheva first tried folding paper at the age of 14 when a mathematics professor brought in a book on kusudamas. The traditional paper sphere technique requires an understanding of geometry to ensure the individual units fit together perfectly with the help of glue or string. A few years later she began to explore much more complicated designs like tessellations, aided by a university degree in mathematics and programming. Through her experimentation and commitment Lukasheva has become so proficient with paper that she’s authored several DIY books featuring some of her original designs. You can follow more of her work on Flickr and Instagram. (via Twisted Sifter)

 

 



Art Illustration

Pat Perry’s Intricate Portraits of People Intertwined with the Natural World

February 21, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Detroit-based artist Pat Perry (previously) renders intricate, fantastical portraits of humans and our relationship to the natural world—a dynamic that is sometimes harmonious, sometimes adversarial.  His multi-media drawings and paintings range from monochrome sketches handheld notebooks to multicolored murals on building walls. In all of his artwork, Perry balances finely worked details with sweeping gestural lines. The artist described his art in an interview with Communication Arts: “I want to make paintings that just softly whisper to you the thing that you forgot.” You can explore more of Perry’s illustrations, including a body of work based on a residency in Katmai National Park, on his website as well as on Instagram and Facebook.

 

 



Design

Larger Than Life Guerrilla Sign Installations by Trevor Wheatley and Cosmo Dean

February 21, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Trevor Wheatley and Cosmo Dean work together to create large installations based around phrases and logos that are part of the common lexicon. Casually used terms like “all good” and the shrug emoji take on larger-than-life dimensions in the duo’s three dimensional versions, which are suspended from cables, integrated into chain link fences, toted in truck beds, and painted alongside graffiti. Wheatley and Dean have partnered with music festivals, fashion brands, and the creative house Justkids to install their work. Up next, the artists will be embarking on a trip to Mexico to create new paintings in rural areas. You can see more installations on their website.